Waldorf Office (301) 645-8035 Oxon Hill Office (301) 292-2300 Endoscopy Center (301) 861-3660 Pathology Lab (703) 893-0851
 
 
 
 
           
 
 

BARRETT'S ESOPHAGUS


Barrett's esophagus is a complication of chronic acid reflux, also known as gastroesophageal reflux deisease (GERD). Acid reflux occurs when stomach acid breaks up into your esophagus. This frequently results in heartburn and can occasionally cause damage to the lining of the esophagus. Stomach acid can cause damage to your esophagus because the lining in your esophagus is not equipped to protect itself against gastric acid. As the esophagus tries to heal, your cells may change in order to adapt and protect the esophagus. These changes can increase your risk of developing esophageal cancer.

One change that can occur is called metaplasia: the process of the irreversible substitution of a distinct kind of cell with another mature cell of another differentiated kind. This occurs when the body starts growing intestinal cells, rather than esophageal cells, in the esophagus because of the acid influx. If the stimulus that caused the metaplasia is removed, tissues can return to their normal pattern of differentiation. If a metaplasia is not addressed in a timely fashion, it can become dysplasia and/or turn cancerous.

Dysplasia comes from the root Greek term meaning "bad formation." It is the term used to refer to an irregularity that hinders call maturation within a particular tissue. Dysplasia is the earliest form of pre-cancerous lesions recognizable in a biopsy, and it is typically referred to as low-grade dysplasia or high-grade dysplasia. Low-grade dysplasia means that the cells show small signs of change, while high-grade dysplasia represents a more advanced condition which may progress to esophageal cancer.

Although the risk of esophageal cancer is small, monitoring of Barrett's esophagus focuses on periodic exams to find precancerous esophagus cells. If precancerous cells are discovered, they can be treated, through procedures such as ablation, to prevent esophageal cancer.
Symptoms of Barrett's Esophagus
  • Frequent Heartburn
  • Difficulty swallowing food
  • Chest pain
  • Upper abdominal pain
  • Dry cough
These symptoms for Barrett's are similar to acid reflux symptoms; however, many people with Barrett's have no signs or symptoms.

Risk Factors for Barrett's esophagus

  • Chronic heartburn and acid reflux - having these symptoms of GERD for more than 10 years can increase the risk of Barrett's esophagus
  • Gender - Men are more likely to develop Barrett's esophagus
  • Race - White people have a greater risk of the disease than do people of other races
  • Age - Barrett's esophagus is more common in older adults, but can occur at any age
Tests to Diagnose Barrett's esophagus

Upper endoscopy - can be performed to diagnosis Barrett's and determine what degree of dysplasia has occurred in your cells. During the procedure, the doctor can examine the esophagus and remove tissue samples for testing.
Treatment for Low-Grade Dysplasia of Barrett's esophagus
  • Maintain a healthy weight
  • Eat smaller, more frequent meals
  • Avoid tight fitting clothes
  • Eliminate heartburn triggers
  • Avoid stooping or bending
  • Avoid lying down after eating
  • Raise the head of your bed
  • Quit smoking
Treatment for High-Grade Dysplasia of Barrett's esophagus
  • Surgery to remove the esophagus
  • Removing damaged cells with an endoscope
  • Using heat to remove abnormal esophageal tissue
  • Using cold to destroy abnormal esophagus cells
  • Destroying damaged cells by making them sensitive to light
If you undergo treatment, other than surgery to remove your esophagus, there is a chance that Barrett's esophagus can recur. For this reason, your doctor may recommend continuing to take acid-reducing medications and having periodic endoscopy exams.
SideBar-Divider.jpg
Abdominal Pain
SideBar-Divider.jpg
Achalasia
SideBar-Divider.jpg
Anorectal Disease
SideBar-Divider.jpg
Celiac Disease
SideBar-Divider.jpg
Chronic Diarrhea
SideBar-Divider.jpg
Chronic Liver Disease
SideBar-Divider.jpg
Cirrhosis
SideBar-Divider.jpg
Colon & Colorectal Cancer
SideBar-Divider.jpg
Constipation
SideBar-Divider.jpg
Crohn's Disease
SideBar-Divider.jpg
Difficulty Swallowing (Dysphagia)
SideBar-Divider.jpg
Diverticulosis and Diverticulitis
SideBar-Divider.jpg
Esophageal Cancer
SideBar-Divider.jpg
Esophageal Varcies
SideBar-Divider.jpg
Esophagitis and Stricture
SideBar-Divider.jpg
Fecal Incontinence
SideBar-Divider.jpg
Gastrointestinal and Gastroenterologist
SideBar-Divider.jpg
Heartburn, Acid Reflux & GERD
SideBar-Divider.jpg
Helicobacter Pylori (Stomach Infection)
SideBar-Divider.jpg
Hemorrhoids
SideBar-Divider.jpg
Hepatitis B
SideBar-Divider.jpg
Hepatitis C
SideBar-Divider.jpg
Hernias
SideBar-Divider.jpg
Hiatal Hernia
SideBar-Divider.jpg
Inflammatory Bowel Disease
SideBar-Divider.jpg
Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS)
SideBar-Divider.jpg
Jaundice
SideBar-Divider.jpg
Liver Cancer
SideBar-Divider.jpg
Liver Disease
SideBar-Divider.jpg
Malabsorbtion
SideBar-Divider.jpg
Pancreatic Cancer
SideBar-Divider.jpg
Pancreatic Cysts
SideBar-Divider.jpg
Pancreatitis
SideBar-Divider.jpg
Peptic Ulcer Disease (PUD)
SideBar-Divider.jpg
Rectal Bleeding
SideBar-Divider.jpg
Reflux Esophagitis
SideBar-Divider.jpg
Silent Reflux (Laryngopharyngeal Reflux)
SideBar-Divider.jpg
Stomach Problems and Swallowing Problems
SideBar-Divider.jpg
Stomach Ulcers
SideBar-Divider.jpg
Strictures
SideBar-Divider.jpg
Ulcerative Colitis
SideBar-Divider.jpg
 
 

Logo-Footer.png


Waldorf Office
3510 Old Washington Road, Suite 201
Waldorf, Maryland 20602

P: (301) 645-8035
F: (301) 645-5229


Oxon Hill Office
6710 Oxon Hill Road, Suite 305
Oxon Hill, Maryland 20745

P: (301) 292-2300
F: (301) 292-8025
E: inquiries(@)giassocmd.com


Endoscopy Center
3510 Old Washington Road, Suite 200
Waldorf, Maryland 20602

P: (301) 861-3660
F: (301) 843-5184


Kensington Pathology
Consultants (Pathology Lab)

6736 Curran Street, Suite 1
McLean, Virginia 22101

P: (703) 893-0851
F: (703) 893-2626
Footer-Information.jpg
About GI Associates of Maryland
Footer-Bar.jpg
Contact Us
Footer-Bar.jpg
Our Locations
Footer-Bar.jpg
For Physicians
Footer-Bar.jpg
Online Referral Scheduling
Footer-Bar.jpg
Notice of Nondiscrimination
Footer-Bar.jpg
Notice of Privacy Practices
Footer-Bar.jpg
Footer-Staff-Services.jpg
Our Providers
Footer-Bar.jpg
Our Procedures
Footer-Bar.jpg
Conditions
Footer-Bar.jpg
For Your Visit
Footer-Bar.jpg
Logo-Footer-StopColonCancerNow.png

Help us promote education and awareness about colon cancer screening and prevention

 
 

Footer-Social-Media-Facebook.png
Footer-Social-Media-Linkedin.png
Footer-Social-Media-Twitter.png

 
 
©2017 GI Associates of Maryland and its licensors. All rights reserved.Web services provided by Balancelogic