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ANORECTAL DISEASE


Anorectal disease refers to ailments of the anus and/or rectum. The most common conditions include hemorrhoids, anal warts, anal fissures, anorectal adscesses, and anal fistulas.
Hemorrhoids

Hemorrhoids develop when tissues of the rectum and anus become swollen and inflamed. Hemorrhoids can be located inside the anus (internal hemorrhoids) or in the area surrounding the anus (external). Common causes of hemorrhoids include:
  • Age
  • Pregnancy
  • Obesity
  • Straining when using the restroom
  • Lifting heavy objects
  • Chronic diarrhea
  • Chronic constipation

Symptoms include pain, inflammation and itching.

Treatment for mild cases of hemorrhoids may include sitz baths, cool compresses, pain relievers and over-the-counter topical medication. For chronic hemorrhoids, there are several options such as hemorrhoid banding, injections and infrared coagulation. Surgical options such as hemorrhoidectomy and stapling are reserved for the most serious cases.


Anal Warts

Condyloma, or anal warts, are caused by the human papilloma virus (HPV) and form on the skin around the anus. There are many types of papilloma virus. Some types develop warts on the hands and feet while others cause genital and anal warts. Many people do not complain of any complications from anal warts. Others complain of itching, bleeding, or moisture in the anal area.

Treatment for anal warts include cauterization, ointments, or a special type of acid (podophyllin or bichloracetic acid). Several treatments are necessary to cure anal warts. Even if the warts have been "removed," the virus can remain in the skin tissue. Follow-up visits are necessary for several months.
Anal Fissures

Anal fissures are small tears in the lining of the anus. These tears can be caused by hard, dry bowel movements, diarrhea, and inflammation. Symptoms include itching, pain, and bleeding.

Surface fissures heal on their own, but deeper fissures may involve the underlying sphincter muscle in the anal canal and not heal properly. For chronic fissures, your doctor will attempt to determine the cause of the fissures and treat any underlying condition. Treatments may include sitz baths, topical anesthetics, or a high-fiber diet.
Anorectal Abscess

When anal glands become infected, bacteria or fecal matter can enter surrounding tissues and create an anorectal abscess. This infection around the anus or rectum is filled with pus and causes pain, swelling, skin irritation, and fever.

If you have Crohn's disease, colitis or other inflammatory bowel disease, you are at higher risk of developing anorectal abscesses. Abscesses are generally treated in a doctor's office using local anesthetic. The doctor makes an opening in the skin near the anus and drains the pus, which is the cause of the pain. Draining the abscess relieves pain and pressure, and most people find relief after the procedure. Larger or deeper abscesses may require an operation.
Anal Fistula

Roughly half of all anorectal abscesses develop into a fistula, an abnormal channel that links infected anal glands to the opening of the skin around the anus. After the abscess has been drained, the passage between the anal gland and the opening in the skin may not always heal. Recurring drainage through the channel can cause fistula formation. Symptoms of an anal fistula are similar to those of an anorectal abscess:
  • Swelling
  • Skin irritation
  • Pus drainage
  • Fever
Unlike anorectal abscesses, fistulas usually do not cause pain, but may produce drainage of fecal material.

Treatment for a fistula is surgery. This involves cutting a small part of the anal sphincter muscle to open the passage and joining the external and internal opening. Healing can then take place from the inside out. With proper healing, the fistula should not return.

If you have any of the symptoms listed above, make an appointment to see your doctor. It may be unpleasant to talk about, but most anorectal disease can be treated.
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Waldorf Office
3510 Old Washington Road, Suite 201
Waldorf, Maryland 20602

P: (301) 645-8035
F: (301) 645-5229


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6710 Oxon Hill Road, Suite 305
Oxon Hill, Maryland 20745

P: (301) 292-2300
F: (301) 292-8025
E: inquiries(@)giassocmd.com


Endoscopy Center
3510 Old Washington Road, Suite 200
Waldorf, Maryland 20602

P: (301) 861-3660
F: (301) 843-5184


Kensington Pathology
Consultants (Pathology Lab)

6736 Curran Street, Suite 1
McLean, Virginia 22101

P: (703) 893-0851
F: (703) 893-2626
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